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. but there is a lot of support for trying to do things that will help make the economy stronger in the short term. universal support for extending the middle-class tax cuts -- that remove much of the greatest risk of the fiscal cliff. there's a lot of support for finding bipartisan consensus on other things that would make the economy stronger, like a set of amendments -- commitments to finance higher levels of infrastructure and education. there is bipartisan support for that. there is bipartisan support for doing the obvious things -- you have to pass an extension of the business expenditures, things that are important to do. there is a lot of support for trying to make some real progress on long-term fiscal challenges. a lot of benefit in doing that for the economy. i think this is a solvable problem and we want to do as much as we can to take advantage of this opportunity to make some progress on each of those fronts. >> one thing about which there does not appear to be agreement -- that is, should the bush tax cuts on over $250,000 be extended, or should they be raised? i heard jay carney sa
the economy into a recession. and late today, a top credit rating agency puts the odds of going off the cliff at 15%. plus, how g.o.p. economic policies could change as election day demographics change. that and more tonight on nbr! the u.s. economy would be driven into recession next year if the fiscal cliff is not solved in time. that's the warning again today from the congressional budget office. and the standard and poor's ratings agency said there's an increasing chance we will go over that cliff of tax increases and spending cuts. it puts the odds at 15%. still, s&p is optimistic about a solution, saying "the most likely scenario, in our view, is that policymakers reach sufficient political compromise in time to avoid most, if not all, potential economic effects of the cliff." both s&p and the congressional budget office warned unemployment would go over 9% by the end of next year if the cliff is triggered. those s&p comments hit the market in the last 30 minutes of trading, extending yesterday's sharp losses. the dow closed down 121 points, the nasdaq lost 41, and the s&p was off 17. t
to establish a demilitarized zone. >>> many investors are wondering where the japanese economy is head headed. we have more from the business de desk. what are investors looking at as they start their week? >> a major figure just came out, and it doesn't look too good. we learn that japan's market analysts have had their fears confirmed with the release of new figures the japanese people have experienced negative growth over july to september. that's the first time in three quarters the economy had contracted. cabinet office officials said monday the couldnntry's real gd fell .9% from the previous three months. that's an annual decline of 3.5%. business owners found their exports shrank 5% due to the economic slowdown. consumers spent less by .a5% as auto sales declined. corporate leaders found capital expenditures down 3.2%. analysts expect continued negative growth in the october-to-december quarter as worsening relations with china dampen exports. >>> as we just saw, the latest figures from japan suggest its economy is facing a setback. let's take a look now to see how markets are reacting
of the economy, but this is has consumption fall as a share of gdp. >> exactly. and this is not a new issue. so we can't expect that just a new bunch of people come in, that the situation will change anytime soon. there are serious structural issues why china remains investment led rather than consumption led and the it would take big and far reaching policy reform to change that. >> will we see these reforms in light of the reports coming out of china as we mentioned with eunice just a few moments ago that perhaps we're not necessarily seeing as a reformist of a leadership for the next couple of years? >> yes, we don't really know what the new leadership is. in fact, for the last ten year, hu jintao was the leader, but the previous leader was in the background and he retained a lot of influence. and now the new leader will have not just hu jintao to deal with, but also his predecessor. so two who he'll have to deal with. 20 old people who used to be on the bureau, all of which will be exercising some influence. so i think this new leadership will be rather constrained at least for the first co
as the chinese economy shows signs of improve. >>> and we'll head out to washington for a view on how the handover of power in china will impact relations in the u.s. >> we're in london to talk about shipping trends. >>> plus what will obama do about the looming fiscal cliff? we'll have plenty of analysis from commentators. >> and we'll hear first from the cfo of aliance. but first day two data suggested growth is picking up and inflation is moderating meaning beijing may have more scope to ease if necessary. ppi industrial output and retail sales all came in better than forecast. eunice joins us from beijing. i'd hate to suggest this is quite good timing for this data. very convenient. >> what are you suggesting? a lot of people are saying that the numbers are showing the economy is bottoming out and a lot of people do use the numbers as a guideline at least. they're saying the investment figures were encouraging. looking relatively strong. the government hasn't put up of much money in the infrastructure projects, so that's part of the equation here. other part is retail and consumpt
longer, providing for their families and generating more income for the economy and for the treasury. i think there are other things you can do, but look, i am open to a conversation about this. when it comes to things like social security, again, you have got to take a mixed approach. look at simpson-bowles or others, they have a combination of revenue and spending reform. >> you are willing to at least look at that? >> i am willing to consider them as part of a possible plan, but i do not think we should jump to solutions, especially in medicare, that's simply transfer cost. in social security there are other ideas, some of which we discussed in the super committee. >> social security has to be a part of this? >> i think we should look at social security as -- that is what simpson-bowles did. they said, look at social security, but not as part of our deficit reduction target. there is room for a conversation there -- what others have said is they do not want that to be part of how you calculate your deficit. >> what do you have to do? you talk about a process that lasted over six mont
ministers to say the economy may already be in recession. one step forward, two steps back. greek lawmakers approve 2013 budget, but germany warns brussels aren't likely to sign off on the next tranche of aid at their meeting today. lorenzo tells cnbc greece needs more time and he's urged europe to extend the company's debt maturities. plus president obama will get a lot of input this week from civic leaders on how to tackle the looming fiscal cliff before he sits down with house and senate leaders on friday. we're up and running for a fresh week of global business news. we'll hear from kelly fairly shortly. also on today's program, we'll be in brussels ahead of the important euro group meeting. focus there on greece and the eu budget. after the weekend, talks collapsed. and the annual world energy outlook report in an hour and plus analysis of where oil prices can be headed. and best buy gets set to join the tablet wars with it insignia flex. what can it offer to customers that the ipad, kindle 5 and surface can't. the first japanese government may be forcesed to lower its outlook for the
about the u.s. economy. >> you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >>> hello. welcome to today's "worldwide exchange". >> 40 unions in 23 countries. that's the strikes that are planned across europe today. so if you thought there couldn't be any coordination, there is coordination. >> how are we going to be affected? >> you know, air travel, surprisingly, they have had to have a lot of cancelling due to strikes. >> we're fully at our jobs. there's two hours of it today. let's remind you exactly what's coming up. we'll have updates from beijing throughout the program as the new generation takes the first step towards leadership. >> and we're in london. talk to the ceo of wpp, martin sorrel. >> we discuss japanese banks. >> and the latest on cisco from silicon valley as the network equipment maker warns of slowing growth this quarter and some falling demand in europe. >> more than 2,000 delegates have cast their votes for china's new central committee, marking the end of the week long communist party. the world will have to wait one more day
+ economy shrank by 0.1%, the second consecutive drop in output. >> there was some positive news, though -- germany's economy weakened less than many had feared. like france, it just managed to eke out some growth. >> elsewhere in the picture, it was anything but rosy. >> people in southern europe have struggled with years of the zero economic growth -- spain, italy, portugal, and greece have seen rising unemployment and chronic budget shortfalls, but now, economic growth is also slowing in northern europe's industrial economies. in europe's biggest economy, germany, third quarter gdp growth came in at just 0.2%. it was the same figure in france, though analysts had been expecting even weaker numbers. in the netherlands, the economy contracted in the third quarter. one reason is more and more consumers are cutting back on their spending, fearing tough times ahead. another reason is that businesses are also scaling back. manufacturers also anticipate weaker demand from struggling eurozone partners. >> news of the recession did not pull down the market drastically. our correspondence sent
. >> the elections are over. the threats to our economy are not. time to get to work. and there is lots of work to be done. it starts with averting this disaster of our own making. i repeat that. the fiscal cliff. we've got it covered from all angles as only cnn can. christine romans is host of cnn's "your bottom line." david walker spent a decade overseeing the federal government, how it spends your tax dollars as the u.s. comptroller general. today he's the ceo of comeback america and he's a deficit hawk. the ceo of pimco. hisfirm is one of the largest investors of bonds, and steve moore is a conservative, founder of club for growth and a writer at the wall street journal. i'm going to start with you, steven, my good friend. the fiscal cliff is an immediate threat. both parties need to come together to fix it, because not fixing it would set even fiscal conservatives back, don't you agree? >> yeah, and i think other conservatives agree that he don't want to go off this fiscal cliff, either. i think one hangup that will start on tuesday is the president will say, look, i was reelected to raise
our economy and create jobs and the decisions we have to make in the coming weeks to help that come about. it is part of governing that these issues arise and we have to deal with them. >> this is a question on the fiscal cliff. you say he will not sign any bill that extends the bush cuts. it is highly unlikely that he would get a bill like that. how open is he to the notion that -- in terms of going forward? is he willing them out completely? >> i am giving you a pretty good printers on the president's thinking going into the process that he said it begins with the specific proposal he has before congress, a plan that achieves balance and that allows us to continue to invest in important areas of the economy. he has not been wedded to every detail of that plan. i will not negotiate hypothetical details. i was side speaker banner and say i am not in the position of boxing ourselves and others. he looks forward to the meeting with leaders in congress. and as clear principles fam belief that we can reach a compromise is comparable. it would allow us to address the fiscal cliff challen
economy are not. time to get to work. and there is lots of work to be done. starts with averting the disaster of our own making. i repeat that. the fiscal cliff. we've got it covered frommive angle. christine romans is host of "your bottom line," richard quest of "quest means business," david walker spent a decade oversaeg the federal government, how it spends your tax dollars as the u.s. comptroller general. today he's the ceo of come back america. he's an unapologetic deficit hawk. mohammed al arian is the ceo of pim he could. his firm is the largest investors in bonds. and stephen moore is the founder of the low tax advocacy group club for growth. i'm going to start with you, stephen. my good friend, the fiscal cliff is the immediate threat both parties need to come together to fix it because not fixing it would set even conservative fiscal causes back, don't you agree? >> yeah. i think most republicans agree. they don't want to go off this fiscal cliff either, ali. i think the one hang-up in negotiations which will start on tuesday is the president says, look, i was re-electe
westgate in london on all of that. japan's economy shrank, first contraction since last year. the data adding to signs of slowing global growth and tensions with china nudging the which i into recession. and yen minute's main oil export pipeline shut after it was blown up in two pieces. local news organizations didn't identify the attackers, but they've been repeatedly sabotaged. finally, iran launched a military drill across half of the country today. government warning it would act again against aggressors. >> where is your jacket? >> i decided in high spirit of rising above to take it off today. but i can't find my pin. >> i'm putting mine on right now. >> it's you saunderstood we're above. p. >> and you're about to talk about corporation news we haven't especially touched on petraeus. maybe we'll sneak that in. >>> htc announcing a global patent settlement and ten year licensing agreement. the deal sends one of the first major conflict of the smartphone patent wars. apple sued accusing the company of infringing on its technology. and citigroup will pay 15.5 million each to former c
of the communist party. we'll be in frankfurt for a look at how that economy has been affected. gdp showing a slowdown for germany in the third quarter. and we'll hear from the former head of the council of economic advisers austan goolsbee on how the u.s. can avoid falling off the fiscal cliff. plus we'll take you live to tokyo with japan hit by election fever. the yen is falling as a repeated call for bold monetary easing. and we'll be live in new york 5:45 a.m. for a look at the u.s. retail sector. walmart and target getting set to release third quarter numbers. >>> chig that's ruling com uhe nus party has lifted the curtain. the unveiling seals so s xi jins rise. hu has seeded oig all powers and that's gives china's next leader a strong mandate. eunice has more for us this morning. it sounds like a pretty signature consolidation of power under xi. >> definitely is a consolidation of power. he'll get a very strong mandate as you had mentioned to run this country the way that he wants. he gets the three top titles, the most powerful are party chief, president as well as military commander
funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: for the first time in four years, president obama did not have to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour" correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage on this day after the election of 2012. >> reporter: mr. obama departed his hometown of chicago this afternoon for washington, his home for another four years. waiting for him: a still- divided congress now facing a critical lame duck session. the president made it clear in his victory speech last night that he thinks the country wants an end to gridlock. >> tonight, you voted for action, not politics as usual. ( applause ) you elected us to focus on your jobs,
cannot win in this economy, then the tipping point has been reached. >> reporter: on the president's "to do" list, economic growth and jobs. immigration reform. and the top priority, those tax cuts set to expire come midnight new year's eve. but whatever difficulties might lie ahead, the president seized his moment early this morning, staking his claim in history with a nod of the lofty rhetoric of his convention speech eight years ago. and his hopes for what might be. >> i believe we can seize this future together, because we are not as divided as our politics suggest. and we remain more than a collection of red states and blue states. we are and forever will be the united states of america. >> reporter: and in that vein, diane, president obama reached out to the house and senate republican leadership, they also pledged to work together to solve this nation's problems. of course, the challenge is turning that rhetoric into reality. diane? >> and we have more on that in a moment. thank you so much, jake. >>> but what about governor romney? after so many years, such a long campaign. what
with a number of leading economist and political scholars on the economy, national security and so-called fiscal cliff. economists for peace and security and the new america foundation's economic growth program are hosting this panel discussion. this is expected to last to go to early this afternoon. this is live coverage on c-spa c-span2. >> questions of military security, national security, economic security, social security, with the broad questions that we have all been grappling with four, intensely for the last four or five years. we are, strictly speaking, a professional organization. we are not an advocacy or lobbying group. we gather together, professionals working on these questions represent only themselves, and who had the advantage i believe of being able to speak to you with clarity and conviction. eps is also a membership organization. our website is www.eps u.s.a..org. and i would invite all of you who are here and all who may be watching to visit the website. and if you share the goals and objectives of the organization to join us, or to lend us your support. we have a great adv
money in washington. what's choking our economy and what's choking the economy of greece, but, entitlements are choking us and we've got to make the real reforms to make sure that we do it right. we protect these programs and thirdly, speaker boehner said it very well, i thought he showed great leadership that revenues need to be on the table. again, we need to do it in the right way. bowles-simpson said reduce the reductions where you can, lower tax raets by doing that. george, we got to get this economy going again. we have had an outside group ernest and young look at raising of taxes on the highest income earners. we would lose 700,000 jobs in america. is that the kind of economy that this president wants to start out with in his second term? i don't think so. president obama said two years ago, now is not the time with a sluggish economy to raise taxes. we need to consider the fact that folks who started raising taxes on the business creators. there's a right way to do this and there's a wrong way to do it. and speaker boehner was absolutely correct, you have to have reve
income tax of 15%. let's make the gift tax 15%. make estate tax 15%. you will see the economy explode. you will see all kinds of revenue come in. use the president's own words. everybody should pay their fair share of flat tax. melissa: i couldn't agree with you more. it is a fantastic idea. it will also never happen. so what do you think is the real solution that we could come to on this? >> well, like i say, it wasn't mitt romney's --. melissa: i no. are republicans going to have to give in and raise marginal tax rate, yes or no? what do you think?. >> i know a lot of us will not. i can't speak for everybody but i know an awful lot of us who simply will not because we know know the damage that will be done to the economy. people will lose their jobs. they will lose their benefits. they will lose their health insurance. too many people will be hurt. so we really do not want to see this president hurt anymore people as he has. melissa: is it worth going over the fiscal cliff? is that better than caving on this issue? >> well, what we've seen in our negotiations over the last two years
on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: with the election over, there's new talk in washington about finally coming to grips with taxes, spending and the deficit. the mammoth problem has been hanging over congress and president for many months, and now, time is running out. in just five days, lawmakers troop back to the capitol for a final, lame-duck session. and they are under mounting pressure to avoid going off the much-talked-about fiscal cliff. come january 1, the bush-era tax cuts will expire as will a 2% payroll tax cut that was passed in december of 2010. at the same time, large automati
-product of growing our economy, energized by a simpler cleaner fairer tax code with fewer loopholes and lower rates for all. >> reporter: democratic senate leader harry reid also says he wants a quick fix for the fiscal cliff. but, he was clearly feeling empowered by a strong showing in the election. >> i want to work together, but i want everyone to understand you can't push us around. >> reporter: and raising taxes on the well-off is clearly a top priority. >> all the exit polling, all the polling we've done, the vast majority of the american people support that, including rich people. >> reporter: many republicans see the election as more of a return to the status quo and that will make negotiations on the fiscal cliff tricky. >> the discussion around taxes will have to be calibrated in a way that recognizes that there are certain red lines for both parties that probably will not be crossed. >> reporter: now that the election is over, policy makers are likely to feel more pressure to reach an agreement to ease the fiscal cliff. the public clearly does not like the automatic spending cuts that ar
is in recession for the second time in three years. unemployment is still going out. the economy is weakening, yet further tax increases are in the pipeline. >> there were protests in at least six european countries today. much of the transport was shut down in a country where unemployment is nearly 26%. in portugal there was a general strike. in greece, protesters cried, and enough is enough. the economy has shrunk 23%. >> they have to a pay attention to the social dimension in europe. at the same time, they have to be a bit more social. they have to be a bit more gentle, but i think they should not step away from austerity measures. >> the stories of hardship and tragedy are increasing. a few days ago, a woman in northern spain committed suicide after being ejected by her home. these protesters are camping, and demanding this be stopped. people are sick of this, he said. sooner or later, it is going to explode. at times in recent weeks, it has seemed as though the eurozone crisis was weakening, but the real economy is worsening, and the frustration is available and s visible on spanish streets.
to do after yesterday. we'll talk more about the economy in a minute with david rosenburg. it was pretty clear yesterday that depending on how you wanted to spin it, could you say how do you do for another four years. i don't remember any euro news in the last six months no matter how bad it was, we didn't get it free handle. so there's more to it than just europe. >> it was the fiscal cliff, but also the financials got hit so hard. if it had been romney, the cliff would be less of a deal because they would stepped all of them. so now we know and we lettered it first hand yesterday. boehner said we're open to tax increase, but part of a bigger plan that involves spending cuts. dove did a bungee -- >> worst thing i ever did. >> but it goes down and then right back up. >> the worst part is you feel like you're connected on something, but don't. it's a free fall until the very he said and then he start to feel like i'm connected to something and it throws being back into the air. >> my question is let's say that it's not a bungee, let's say it's a rope. so you jump and then you -- that woul
the economy. >> i think the prospects have a markedly improved as a result of the reform program and the government's bold actions. >> many in portugal have lost faith in european leaders. antagonism towards the heads of the german and portuguese governments has reached new heights. >> the way they treat us is a joke. he is no more than merkel's puppet and what they're doing is just wrong. the sacrifices we are being asked to make our a reasonable. "she is just one of many voices calling on them to live within their means but many face an uncertain future with increasing poverty levels and they are determined to resist any more economic pain. >> as we just saw, the portuguese austerity measures are not very popular. we asked our correspondence much and she had today to convince the portuguese of the need for continued austerity. >> she said she is here to see firsthand how the process is going on. her colleague told her about the process and of course she was already a winner of the statistics showing portugal is on track, as they always say they are, but unfortunately people hav
impact. >> definitely. year over year, oil demand is up. we've had very weak economy in europe. not much growth in the united states. but i think that's the trend we'll be playing out for the next few years. >> oil 110 at the moment. is that a fair price? >> there's premium built in because of geopolitical risks. i think premium is probably justifiable. you look at wti at $23 discount to where breptd is. that's not sustainable in the long time, but given inventory levels, that will stay. >> do you keep your trade on oil? >> we have neutral position, but we're short the front month. respe respect. we make money by rolling the contracts the other way around. we're long oil in the 12 months forward rolling in to the 13th month and we end up with little more oil with that strategy. so more of a curve play. >> all right. patrick, you're with us for the first half hour. also we'll be out to new york for a check of the retail sector in the wake of super storm sandy. some department stores are getting ready to report third quarter numbers. >> we're also live in italy ahead of the three biggest b
in the broader economy. those comments live in just a few minutes. lori: interesting. the remarks coming after they come off of the weakest decline in a year. the markets near session highs, but will the market like what they hear? melissa: plus, what will the next four years mean for the oil and gas industry? the ceo will join us coming up. but it is time for stocks as we do every 15 minutes let's head to the floor of the new york stock exchange. stocks are climbing higher after the two-day drop. sandra: they did not start out that way, there was fear we would have another dramatic selloff today. now we are somewhat up from about 61 points. that is not exactly a rally. bouncing back a little bit ahead of the weekend, but still the worst two-day drop in a year, 434 points loss over that wednesday and thursday. as we face a fiscal cliff, consumer sentiment one piece of economic data that came out today better than expected in november hitting a five-year high, getting a little bit of a boost in the stock market. wholesale inventories 1.1% in september, above expectations, that is adding a bit t
the economy stronger white a set of commitments to finance, a high level of public investments in infrastructure and education and a lot of bipartisan support for that. i think there's a lot of support for doing the obvious things you have to do. you have to pass an extension tax of the amt is very important to do. you listen carefully there's a lot of support for trying to make real progress on the long-term fiscal soundness. there's a lot of benefit in doing that for the economy. how you do that is important. so i think this is a solvable problem and we want to do as much as we can to take an advantage of this opportunity to make some progress in each of those fronts. >> there's one thing about which they're doesn't appear to be a lot of agreement and that is should the bush tax cuts on the overt and hundred 50,000 crowd be extended or should taxes be raised? >> i heard jay carney an hour or so ago say the president will not agree to anything that extends the tax cuts on the upper brackets. that sounds like a line in the sand; is it? >> i do think it's important to start by a
thought that was amazing. it's a command economy. maybe they can pull it off. if they do it, they can take the whole world with them up, up. >> the governor hinting perhaps the data to be released tonight, tomorrow in china, will be better than expected. hinting at continuing slow growth. slow but it is growth and that's the important thing coming to china. we're getting notes and recognize there's certain china stocks. truck engines. we are seeing that last month was good. now, that's very contrary to what a lot of other retail and people saying retail commentary, distorted by the weather. but this china trade is gaining momentum, not losing momentum. at the same time that i feel that united states is losing momentum. >> interesting comments out of the boe. we knew that central banks doing nothing and governors now saying, qe which they have been pouring on for a long time, going to flatten out at the asset purchase levels and not having the impact. >> china trade. second is housing. i think they haven't done enough to be able to revitalize to be what i regard as the housing part of the g
things resolved, get the economy back on track. but, i think it's undeniable based on the results in the house, in the senate as well as the presidency that people are supporting the idea of a more progressive version of the government designed to stand-up for the middle class and that we are all in this together and people aren't on their own and shouldn't be on their own. i'm hopeful the republicans in the house of representatives will come to the conclusion they can't continue to stand by a hard line position of no compromise. the one thing i think is clear is the american people want government to work and that's going to require compromise. >> the american people want government to work. wanting it doesn't make it so. ed, you are an outspoken supporter to mitt romney and a donor to a super pac. >> yes. >> i can understand how you feel about the presidential election because the person you were backing didn't win. when you look at the senate and congress and how congress is going to work with the president, how you interpret or understand the election results? >> one thing is
line on concerns about the so- called fiscal cliff. some economists believe the economy could gain strength if lawmakers can reach a deal sooner rather than later. bloomberg news reports google is being pressured by the ftc to resovle anti-trust issues or face a lawsuit in the next few days. google is accused of abusing its dominance in the internet world. and wednesday is the next lock- up expiration on facebook, allowing employees to sell their shares of fb. good morning to larry shover of sfg alternatives. good to have you on the show larry. there seems to be a shift in the market. everybody is so fixated on this fiscal cliff. is the market going to be rather lackluster for a couple of days here because of that? > > i think it is. i think people are really concerned about something they should be concerned with. but the fact is, something will break. they will reach some sort of compromise. it might not be something that everybody likes, but i think the market will end up liking it, because there will be stability, there will be a compromise, at least by the end of the year. > >
his first press conference after the election, and he would like to focus on the economy, but i think the majority of the journalists will just as more about petraeus and about general allen. the cia had eight directors in the past seven years, and it is bad for the cia, bad for the military, and bad for president obama. >> thanks for that. >> in germany, greenpeace is calling for a fresh start in the search for a long term dump for nuclear waste. >> the environmental group says a new commission should be set up to consider a range of possible sites with maximum input from the public. it says that after years of controversy, the government should give up on the old salt mine that has been the longest running candidate. >> research into weather this underground site is the right place to store nuclear waste started 35 years ago. the protests against it are just as old. greenpeace says it is time to change tack and that the search for a storage site for nuclear waste should start from scratch with greater involvement by ordinary people. >> a permanent storage site can only work if there
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 141 (some duplicates have been removed)